Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Film review: Ian Thomas Ash's "-1287"

I knew it was going to be a sad film. It was about this woman with a terminal cancer, and from the film title "-1287" and trailer, we can infer that it's about her death, and probably that the number -1287 is some number of days having to do with her death. The entire audience in the small theater where I watched it knew it too, and we all expected to shed some deserved tears in the end.

The ending was pretty much what I think we all predicted—but what we weren't prepared for was to experience the death of someone close: someone who is so much alive with  sense of humor pouring out, and genuine laughter from her belly. After the showing of the film, one of the audience members (while sobbing) said, "I'm so sad and can't find words because I feel like someone I knew has just died." That may sound a bit too dramatic if you haven't seen this film, but I shared this sentiment, and so did the rest of the audience, I'm sure. I couldn't stop crying. It wasn't so much about her death itself that made me cry— instead what moved me was how she lived and the tender and honest conversations she had with the filmmaker (Ian Thomas Ash.) And how she wanted to be loved—"truly truly truly" loved by someone, and how she wanted that even until the very last days of her life. 


We know death happens to all of us one day. What we don't know is when that one day is going to be and how to come to terms with it. And we really don't think about it so much because we somehow effortlessly forget the fact that we all die one day or maybe because it's just simply scary to even imagine. When the movie star Ken Takakura (he's often noted as "Japan's Clint Eastwood") passed away last month, I came across many tweets saying something like, "I never thought he would actually die one day!" As silly as those tweets may sound, that's probably how we think of our own death too: we just can't imagine we all die one day! 

In "-1287", through the lens of Ian, we get to know Kazuko, a lovely woman in her 60s, who loves cooking and reading books in English. It begins with a shot in her kitchen where she's cooking for him. Then he starts asking her questions. The film consists only of dialogues between Ian and Kazuko: dialogues of two complete strangers to me. But to my surprise, I was quickly drawn to their world and the tender moments the filmmaker shared with Kazuko. The tender moments of the two of them were so intimate and perhaps so personal that I sometimes felt shy or even wrong about watching it. It's not because of what they talk about; Ian asks Kazuko fairly general questions: who she is, about her family and her hobbies—and then he moves on to ask her about her illness, and about big questions: life and love.

What made me feel a bit shy watching was I think the tone of his voice. He's shooting the film so we don't usually see him on the screen. We saw him occasionally when she held the camera, but we mostly just heard his sweet, calm, warm, modest, and sometimes very interrogative tone of voice. And how happy & shy she looked, responding to his voice, which revealed a unique intimacy they embraced together. Their conversations (carried out mostly in Japanese, sometimes in English) were incredibly real and honest; not even a tiny bit was phony. I don't even know how I know that, because I don't know her in person but I was somehow able to sense that she was true to herself, and to Ian, the filmmaker. Maybe it was more about him. She wanted him to hear her story. Her true story—the true her, that she'd probably never shown to anybody before. 

After the film, Ian was invited on stage so we could ask him questions and/or share our thoughts with him. One woman in the back said, "I'm turning 70 so I'm Kazuko's age, and I envy her that she had a friend like you. I have a husband but we never really talk. I wish I had someone to tell honest stories to each other, like you and Kazuko did." She continued, "Maybe it's my generation thing, or maybe it's a Japanese thing. We don't really talk!"

I looked at Mike who was sitting next to me and I thought, no, it's not a generation thing or a Japanese thing. We're a bit younger and married internationally, and we do talk but we don't tell honest stories to each other, the way Ian and Kazuko did, either. Then I thought, do I tell honest stories to anyone really? To my parents? To my brother? To my best friends back home? 

We never know what the future holds; we don't even know about tomorrow. But there is one thing that we know for sure: we all die one day, sooner or later. That much we know. I think about this fact a lot lately thanks to this film—but give it a week or two, I can assure you I won't be thinking about it a lot anymore. But I just don't want to forget the conversations between Kazuko and Ian and how she lived and shared her honest stories with him, and with us.

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

3週間くらい前の書きかけの日記

書きかけの日記のようなものをフォルダ内に見つけた。未完成だけど、この先何が起こったのか全然思い出せないので書き加えず、載せてみることにした:


10月23日 木曜日

六時五十分起床。目覚ましは六時半に鳴ったが三回ほどスヌーズボタンを押し、ようやくベッドから這い上がる。ひんやりと冷たい空気。冬のようだ。外はどんより、昨日から雨が降り続いている。寝癖がひどいのでシャワーを浴びる。やっと目が覚めてきた。まだマイクはベッドに居るようだ。私が大学で日本語を教える月曜と木曜はふたり同じ時間に家を出て、同じ電車に乗り込んで出かける。髪の毛を乾かしているとマイクがゴソゴソと起きて来て、ボサボサ頭のままキッチンで私のためにコーヒーを淹れ始める。まずは一杯、私がお化粧をしながら飲むためのコーヒーを淹れてくれる。それから休む間もなく私が授業中に飲む用のコーヒーを続けて作り、ポットに入れてくれる。七時四十五分。ふたり慌ただしく家を出る。外はまだ冷たい雨が降る。私は短めの茶色のブーツを履いて出たが、階段の途中で気変わりし、家に一旦戻り紺の長靴に履き替えた。七時五十三分。渋谷から来る新宿駅行きのバスを交差点で見かけて、ふたり走り始める。永福町や方南町から来るバスもあるが、いつも混んでいて座れないので、いつだって空いていて座れる渋谷バスを私達は「ゆとりバス」と呼び、好んで利用する。八時ちょっと過ぎ。新宿駅に着く。朝のラッシュで駅構内は幾十もの人の波が寄せては返し、うまく歩けない。マイクの手を握りそのひと波ひと波をすり抜けてなんとか小田急線の地下改札に辿り着く。改札の左横にあるおむすび屋で私は小さいタラコと鮭のおむすびを二つ、マイクは大きい明太高菜のを一つ買う。改札をくぐり、階段を上がり、ホームへ。マイクはキオスクでコーラを買う。八時十八分発の急行片瀬江ノ島行きに乗り込む。乗る車両は出来るだけ前の方。私はどの車両でも構わないのだが、マイクは端の車両の方が比較的人が少ないのでそれを好む。席に座り出発までの数分、私達はつい今しがた買ったおむすびの包みを開け、もぐもぐとやり始める。私は小さなタラコのむすびを食べ、鮭の方は後で食べるようにバッグにしまった。ふと車内の広告に目をやると、東京農業大学の「収穫祭」というイベントの広告がある。今日ちょうど「収」という漢字を教えるので丁度いい、とマイクにその写真を撮ってもらう。そうこうしているうちに発車の時間。私は一昨日届いた黒柳徹子の本を読み始める。一言一言が面白く、ゆっくり噛み締めて読みたいのだが、もう100頁くらい読んでしまった。早く続きが読みたいが、いつまでも終わって欲しくない本だ。こういう本に出会えた時は本当に幸せだ。八時四十分。成城学園前着。ここでマイクとは暫しのお別れ。彼はこのまま1時間ほど電車に揺られ、湘南台駅まで行く。アイラブユーと言い、電車を降りる。隙あらばキスをして降りるが、今日はしなかった。私でも人目が気になる時がある。

Sunday, October 5, 2014

A new translation of "Love" by Tanikawa

Love

Love  It's easy to say
Love  Not too difficult to write either

Love  We all know the feeling
Love  It is to like someone until you grow sad

Love  You always want them to be near
Love  You wish them to live forever

Love  It's not the word, love 
Love  Not just a feeling either

Love  It's to not forget the distant past 
Love  It's to believe in a future you can't see

Love  It's to think over and over again  
Love  It's to live at the risk of one's life

---Shuntaro Tanikawa
(English translation by Naoko Smith



  
あい
(『みんなやわらかい』より 1999年)
          谷川俊太郎

あい 口で言うのはかんたんだ
愛 文字で書くのもむずかしくない
 
あい 気持ちはだれでも知っている
愛 悲しいくらい好きになること

あい いつでもそばにいたいこと
愛 いつまでも生きていてほしいと願うこと

あい それは愛ということばじゃない
愛 それは気持ちだけでもない

あい はるかな過去を忘れないこと
愛 見えない未来を信じること
 
あい くりかえしくりかえし考えること
愛 いのちをかけて生きること

(Any copyrighted material on this website is included as "fair use," for the purpose of study, review or critical analysis of literary translations only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s).)

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Words from Berlin

My bible here : "Berlin Guidebook" by Masato Nakamura

So I'm in a hotel room in Berlin, watching local news on TV, munching on chips, drinking grape juice and trying to write a digest of my stay so far. Mike and I decided to come to Berlin and have a little vacation before and after his meetings on Sep 10th and 11th. I had never been to Berlin or Germany before, and my teaching job at a college doesn't begin until the mid-September, so we couldn't think of any reasons not to. 

as I write this blog at a hotel room...

We arrived here last Wednesday, so it's been exactly one week since then. Everything seemed "wunderbar!" the first couple of days; we enjoyed the gorgeous fall weather (coming from muggy Tokyo where it was still the midst of summer), there were no yucky mosquitoes (while Tokyo seems to be suffering from a pandemic of Dengue fever, believed to have been spread from mosquitoes in Yoyogi park), everyone speaks English, we didn't have any problems getting around the town (thanks to the excellent subway system in Berlin), trains run on time and more frequently than the ones in Tokyo—plus it's never crowded even when everyone seems to be heading home. I was like, wow! I could imagine living here! 

First exploration day! Near Kurfürstendamm street, Berlin

On our 3rd or 4th day here though, I was already starting to notice shortcomings of this "wunderbar" city, and this makes me realize how quickly I take things for granted and start bitching about what I miss or what I don't have. For example, I was getting annoyed by not being able to find public bathrooms easily, because there are *always* toilets at the train stations in Japan (though when in Japan, I often complain about the presence of filthy traditional Japanese toilets and how unnecessary they are.) Even if I find toilets here, we usually have to pay to use, so before I know it, I naturally began to rant, "Come on! Who needs to pay to pee? It's the most basic of minimum human rights we should never have to ask for!!"

Subway station, Berlin

In addition to the lack of free public toilets, I began to notice how dirty some streets are here; there's trash littered around in some places even though there are trash bins available (for everyone to use, for free!) at every corner. I often heard people outside Japan saying how clean the streets in Tokyo are, but I'd never thought Tokyo was such a clean city before I came here; I was wrong! Considering there are 20-30 million people living there and no trash cans available on the street, Tokyo does hella good job keeping the city as clean as it is.  

Mauerpark—with some garbage scattered on the grass, in spite of several huge dumpsters in the park

I assure you that when I go back to Tokyo I'll find everything to be marvelous the first couple of days but I will soon find something to complain about; whether it's the humidity or mosquitoes, I don't want to do that! So that's why I wanted to take time to write my reflections while I'm still in Berlin. 

Trying to look pensive at Nikolaiviertel

There are things that Berlin and Germany in general do so well, so much better than Tokyo or Japan do; how they face and handle some of the darker chapters in their history is one. We went to the Holocaust memorial (Holocaust-Mahnmal) just a couple of blocks from Brandenburger Tor. There, you'll see thousands of stone monuments laid out in all different heights. We couldn't find any sign or a board explaining what they are so we decided to walk in the narrow paths in between the monuments. Within a few seconds of being down there, you'll realize what these stones represent and at the same time, you start having some indescribable fear. However, in order to escape from that scary maze, you'll need to continue walking in the narrow paths. The taller the stones get, the scarier it gets; you never know what's going to happen at the very next corner. I almost bumped into someone at the corner who was also finding his way out. 

Holocaust-Mahnmal, Berlin
These stones were laid out pretty close to each other and are a lot taller than us, so we needed to be careful not bumping into other people coming from different directions.

We then found this very insignificant looking sign just a few minutes walk from the Holocaust memorial and learned that it was where Hitler and his wife committed suicide. We couldn't believe how so unremarkable it looked compared to how those Japanese war criminals are treated (as gods) in Japan. There, too, we feel like we eye-witnessed great efforts and commitments of German people, not wanting to repeat that not-so-proud part of their history again, without hiding or turning their back from it. They must not be proud of their dark history during the Nazi regime, but they must be very proud of how they dealt with (and still dealing with) history and accepted and made amends for past wrongdoings. I am amazed and saddened by how hard it is for Japan to do the same. 

Where Adolf Hitler committed suicide — his underground bunker

Other than having free public toilets at the train stations, perhaps, there are things Japan/Japanese people do so well, too; superb customer service is one. I always thought that cliche "o-mo-te-na-shi" is overrated, but now I have to disagree with myself-then. Of course there are rude people everywhere you go, but Japanese people normally tend to go out of their way to be polite and kind—though not necessarily always friendly—especially to their customers. When you are a customer in Japan, you should be treated like a king or even a god (as in "customer is god" お客様は神様です), but in foreign countries, I'm not god, and I sometimes even feel like I'm actually working for them! 

Monday evening after we came back from Hamburg, I took a short nap. When I got up and opened the curtain, there was "super-moon" gracefully floating in the sky; that same moon that Japanese people enjoyed several hours ago. I realized some things are the same, even on the other side of the world. Everywhere you go, there are pros and cons. No place is perfect—though Sweden or Switzerland seem to be perfect, but I'm sure I'll find something to bitch about once I visit there. So, once I'm back in Tokyo, I promise I will try to focus on the bright side and won't complain too much, for a week or two at least! :)))))

Super-Moon in Berlin! (Monday, Sep 8th, 2014)

More later... 

Photoautomaten is obligatory, isn't it?



Tuesday, August 5, 2014

日本で日本語を教えるという事① Teaching Japanese in Japan 〜Vol. 1

今年4月より、世田谷区にある成城大学で日本語上級クラスを教えさせてもらえることになり、先月末、無事前期の授業を終えることができた。前期と言っても、昨年9月から成城で学んで来た交換留学生にとってはこの学期をもって成城での一年が終わることになる。私はこれまでアメリカの大学院で3年、そしてミドルベリー大学の夏期日本語学校で教えた経験しかなく、日本で学ぶ学生、しかも上級レベルを教えるのは初めてとあって、最初は七転八倒の日々...。それでも学生達はそんな未熟な私に匙を投げることなく、最後までついてきてくれた。ご苦労様、よく頑張ったね、そしてありがとう、という気持ちを込めて、期末テストが終わった翌週、学生達を下北沢にあるメキシコ料理店に誘った。

下北沢にあるメキシコ料理店Tepitoにて。左から夫マイク、米国出身のバックさん、オマーン&フランス出身のヒッシャムさん、オーストラリア出身のベンさん、そして米国出身のアンディーさん。

4月から7月までの3ヶ月は授業の準備で精一杯でブログを書いている余裕がなかったので、これから9月の新学期が始まるまでの間、先学期のこと、日本で日本語を教えるというのはどういうことなのか、という私感を少しずつ書いていこうと思う。


Tuesday, July 22, 2014

A new translation of 「夕立の前」 BEFORE THE SUMMER EVENING RAIN SHOWER by Tanikawa

BEFORE THE SUMMER EVENING RAIN SHOWER
 

Stretching out on a chair like a dog and smelling the air of the summer
The sound of the harpsichord, which enchanted me so much only a moment ago,

Began to seem like some outrageous temptation
It's because of this stillness

Stillness sounds from where a number of faint lives resonate
Hum of horsefly, murmur from the distance, a breeze fluttering the leaves of grass


Can't hear the silence no matter how carefully you listen but

Stillness comes to our ears with ease
Through the dense atmosphere surrounding us

Silence belongs to a dilution of the infinity of the universe
Stillness is rooted in this Earth

But I wonder if I heard enough of it
When a woman accused me, sitting in this same chair
Sharp thorns of her words lead to hair roots intertwined underground

There was tranquility lurking in her voice, refusing to fade away into the silence of death  
Lightening flashed from clouds in the distance to the ground 
After a while, the rumbling of thunder slowly drew a long tail

The sound from the time before humans emerged in this world
We can hear still


---Shuntaro Tanikawa
(Translated by Naoko Smith)

Taken from the bridge near Shinjuku Central Park (7/22/14)


夕立の前(『世間知ラズ』より 1993)

谷川俊太郎

椅子の上でからだを伸ばし犬みたいに夏の空気を嗅ぐと
今しがたぼくをあんなにうっとりさせたチェンバロの音色が
何かけしからん誘惑のようにも思えてくる
それというのもこの静けさのせいだ

静けさはいくつものかすかな命の響き合うところから聞こえる
虻の羽音 遠くのせせらぎ 草の葉を小さく揺らす風......

いくら耳をすませても沈黙を聞くことは出来ないが
静けさは聞こうと思わなくとも聞こえてくる
ぼくらを取り囲む濃密な大気を伝わって
沈黙は宇宙の無限の希薄に属していて
静けさはこの地球に根ざしている

だがぼくはそれを十分に聞いただろうか
この同じ椅子に座って女がぼくを責めたとき
鋭いその言葉の棘は地下でからみあう毛根につながり
声には死の沈黙へと消え去ることを拒む静けさがひそんでいた

はるか彼方の雲から地上へ稲光りが走り
しばらくしてゆっくりと長く雷鳴が尾をひいた
人間がこの世界に出現する以前から響いていた音を
私たちは今なお聞くことが出来る

(Any copyrighted material on this website is included as "fair use," for the purpose of study, review or critical analysis of literary translations only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s).)

Friday, June 13, 2014

Friday, June 6, 2014

梅雨入り the rainy season has begun in Tokyo

夜通し降り続いた雨
今朝も懲りずに
ベランダのバジルの葉を濡らしてる

梅雨どき生まれの私は
雨音を聴くと心躍り
そして落ち着く

今日もお気に入りの
グリーンの長靴履いて
東京の街を闊歩するのです




Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Without Saying Good-Bye

It was a nice warm spring day today.
Mike and I went to take a walk in the park in the evening.
The cherry blossoms were all gone, 

As if they never even existed to begin with.

We went to look for "our" cat, Non-chan,
Who's missing for days now.
No luck.
Neither of us wanted to articulate 

What that's supposed to mean.
Sometimes it's better
To leave things vague and unfinished.

I thought about my uncle again.
He's gone and nothing is left, 

Like those cherry trees in the park.
But he lived in this world.
He certainly did.
 

It was a long cold winter. 

When the spring finally came to Tokyo,
Without seeing cherry blossoms,
Non-chan and my uncle decided to go, 

Without saying good-bye.



Thursday, March 27, 2014

廣之おじさんのこと

伯父さんは、廣之おじさんは、奥沢の線路沿いにある
陽の当たらない小さなアパートの台所の床で、冷たくなっていた
おまわりさんが駆けつけて来るまでの間、マイクと抱き合って
声を上げて泣いた
目の前で起きていることが信じられなかった
この目に映るもの全てを、信じたくなかった

その夜お父さんが東京へ来て、警察で遺体を確認した
変わり果てたおじさんの姿に、動揺を隠せないでいた
私はそれを見て、陰でまた何度も泣いた

次の日、お父さんと一緒におじさんの部屋を整理した
買い物をしたレシートを見てみると
イチゴ、とあった
おじさんは苺が好きだったのだろうか
明日、棺に入れてあげようか
私はおじさんの事をまったく知らない

おじさんの携帯電話の電話帳には
ひらがなで名前が二つ、登録されてあった

いしくら たきお
いしくら ゆきひさ

二年前に亡くなったもう一人の叔父さんとお父さんの名前
おじさんからすると、ふたりの弟だ
おじさんは結婚したことがなかったし
友達もいなかった
おじさんの小さな世界には、頼れる人はお父さんしかいなかった

私はおじさんの存在すらもよく知らずに育ち
よく知ろうともしなかった
こんなに近くに住んでいたのに
一度も会いに行かなかった
会おうと思えばいつでも行けたのに
でももう遅い
おじさんは寒い冬の夜
ひとりで逝ってしまった

警察のひとが検視をしているあいだ
私はマイクと等々力渓谷に行った
おじさんが好んで散歩をしたコースらしい
そこを歩いて、等々力不動のベンチで
マイクは疲れた、と横になった

私は膝枕をしてやりながら
彼の首筋のぬくもりを確かめていた
さっき触ったおじさんの頬は
まるで氷のようにひんやり冷たく硬かった

生きているということは
それだけで本当に尊いことで
毎日誰かがどこかで命を落とし
それでも世界は動き続ける

今週末には東京でも桜が満開になるだろう
おじさん、もう少しで桜が見られたのに

悔やんでも悔やみきれない
春の冷たい雨の降る、三月最後の木曜日


Saturday, March 22, 2014

音楽を聴く耳と文章のリズム ー 村上春樹が言うところの、文章と音楽のの深〜い関係

「いつか土に帰る日までの一日」という谷川俊太郎の詩に最近出合い、英語に翻訳させてもらった。その中で一番好きなくだりがこれだ:

日記を書きたかったが眠くて書けなかった
一日の出来事のうちのどれを書き
どれを書かないかという判断はいつもむずかしい
書かずにいられないことは何ひとつないのに
何も書かずにいると落ち着かないのは何故だろう

I wanted to write a diary, but I was too sleepy to write
To decide which events of the day to write about
Or not (to write about) is always difficult
There is not one thing that I cannot live without writing
But why don't I feel at ease if I don't write anything?

この部分を読んだ時、「まったくだ!」とよく落語家が扇子でやるように、膝をぴしゃりと叩きたくなった。私は一日が終わる頃、書きたいことで頭がいっぱいになっている事が多い。最近では、ニュースにもなったベビーシッターについて、アメリカ事情と比較してどうして日本では健全なベビーシッター文化が成り立たないかを検証したり、東京で初めて出来た友達でカザフスタン出身のアイスルという医学生の事とか、銭湯にみる、服を脱いでも化粧を落としても美しい人の共通点とか、独断と偏見で綴る、日本よりアメリカの方が優れている物とか、米人の夫の日本語の間違いを指摘したら、私が崇拝するWorld Englishes的観点から「僕は僕のvarietyを喋ってるんだ。君はLinguistic Imperialistだ!」とまっとうな反論されて度肝を抜かれた事とか、この間行って来たハネムーンの事とか、それはもう書きたいことだらけで収拾がつかなくなっている。

谷川俊太郎が言うように、この中で書かずにいられないことは何ひとつない。書き始めたら意外と5行くらいであっけなく終わってしまうような、取るに足らない話題だらけなのかも知れない。でも何も書かずにいると無性に落ち着かなくなり、罪悪感にまで苛まれる始末だ。しまいには眠くなってベッドにもぐり込んでしまうのだが、朝起きてまたひとつ、ふたつ、と書きたい事が増え、リストは果てしなく長くなる一方なのだ。




ところで、今日書きたかったのは、書きたいことが山ほどある!という事ではない。今読んでいる本の事を書きたかったのだ。その本とは、「小澤征爾さんと、音楽について話をする」という題の本で、2011年に出版された。小澤征爾が村上春樹の自宅で熱いほうじ茶を飲んでクラシックのCDを聴きながら音楽談義したものが、そのままふたりの会話形式で綴られている。ここで私が目を見張ったのが、村上春樹のクラシックを聴く耳についてだ。彼は専らジャズを好んで聴くひとだとばかり思い込んでいたからだ。彼の知識の深さにはマエストロも驚きを隠せないでいた。村上春樹は途中で、「文章と音楽との関係」について触れている。彼いわく、音楽的な耳を持っていないと、文章はうまく書けない。なぜなら、文章で一番大事なのはリズムで、リズムのない文章を書く人には、文章家としての資質はないからだそうだ。私はそこでやけに納得してしまった。私が村上春樹の文章が好きなのは、彼の持つ音楽的な文章から醸し出されるリズムを感じ取っていたからなのかも知れない、と。

そうやって自分が都合の良いように勝手に解釈したのには、理由がある。カクイウ私も音楽家の端くれだからだ。私は国立の音楽学部のある大学を第一志望としていて、ピアノから声楽、ソルフェージュ、聴音、音楽の理論が実技試験で課された。が、センター試験の結果がボロボロだったため、その大学には不合格になってしまった。浪人は経済的に無理だったので、第三志望の私立の大学へ進学したものの、周りの友達はサークルとバイトに明け暮れる毎日で、私は自分の居場所を見出せなかった。私は勉強がしたかったし、何よりピアノが弾きたかったのだ。そこで選んだ道は、アメリカへの留学。私の人生はそこで大きく変わった。

交換留学でお世話になったアーカンソーの州立大学で出会ったのは、スミス教授というピアノの先生だった。交換留学生は専攻は関係なく、基本的にどんな授業でも履修していいことになっていた。名門インディアナ大学のピアノ課で博士号をとったスミス教授は、ピアノ専攻の学生しかレッスンを持たないと聞いていたが、私はすぐにスミス教授のオフィスのドアを叩き、先生のもとでピアノを習わせて欲しい、と懇願しに行った。じゃあ、何か弾いてみなさい、と突然言われて弾いたのがショパンでもバッハでもなく、何を思ったか坂本龍一のEnergy Flow だった。その時暗譜していた曲がそれしか思いつかなかったのだ。弾き終わって恐る恐るスミス教授の表情を窺うと、「君はいい音を出す。いいピアニストだ」と即座に入門を認めてくれた。

本の前半で小澤征爾と村上春樹が、ベートーヴェン・ピアノ協奏曲第三番について語っているのだが、小澤征爾がオーケストラとピアノの間の取り方について話している所がある。そこで小澤が『ティー・ヤター』とか『ティイーヤンティー』とか言っているのを読んで、懐かしくて笑ってしまった。スミス教授も、よくリズムの説明をする時に、『ティー・ヤッタッタ・ヤッタッタ・ヤッタッタター』とか言って教えてくれたからだ。それまで外国の先生に外国語でピアノを教わったことがなかった私には、そのティー・ヤターがとても新鮮で、本当のところを言うと初めの頃は吹き出すのをこらえるのに必死だった。だってスミス教授、大真面目な顔をして、ヤッタッタヤッタッタ言ってるんですもの!

そんな昔の出来事に思い出し笑いしながら、本の音楽談義に出て来る、内田光子の演奏(ベートーヴェン・ピアノ協奏曲第三番、第三楽章)を最後に紹介します。小澤征爾曰く、内田光子は「本当に耳が良くて、音が実にきれいで、『思い切りがいい』ピアニスト」らしい。私も実は数年前、ボストンで彼女がモーツァルトのピアノ協奏曲を弾くのを生で見たことがあるので、彼女の音のきれいさについては知っていたが、この演奏を聴いて小澤征爾が言うところの「思い切りの良さ」も頷ける。気付くと前のめりになって聴いてしまっているような、人を惹き付けるパワフルな演奏だ。彼女もまた、質のいい文章家であるに違いない。







Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Living in Tokyo — 東京に住むということ

米国の大学院卒業を機に夫と結婚し、昨年の5月に夫の住むこの大都会、花のみやこ東京に引っ越して来た。それから一年近く経とうとしている最近になってようやく、東京に住んでいる、という「気」がするようになってきた。というのも、今まではどこか自分の居場所が不透明と言うか、東京に居を構えてはいるものの、吹きすさぶこの東京砂漠が日々吐き出すようにオファーしてくれるものの数々を、上手く消化しきれていない、そんな気がしていたからだ。

二月最後の金曜日、新宿のアパートで一人ラジオを聴いていた私は、たまたま合わせたFM局で流れていたに、こころを奪われた。少しハスキーな女性の声が所々日本語の混じる歌詞に乗せて心地よく耳に入って来る。J-Popという名の下で訳の分からないジャンルの音楽が氾濫する日本で、こんなにステキな音楽を作るひとが居たのか、これは一体誰なのだろう?と曲の終わりに歌い手が紹介されるのを、まだかまだかと待った。そのひとは、マイア・ヒラサワ、と言う日系スウェーデン歌手で、なんとたまたまその日、来日していて東京のスタジオに生出演していたのだ。その番組で、まさにその日の夜、代官山の書店でその人がミニライブを開く事を知り、次の日の朝一番の電車で帰郷するという予定も顧みずに、ひとりバスに乗り夜の代官山に向かった。


マイア・ヒラサワのミニライブのつい一週間前、私は夫と共に武道館に居た。彼の博士号の指導教官である教授が、突然都合がつかなくなったとのことで、あのエリック・クラプトンの来日初日公演のチケットを譲ってくれたのだ。前の日までまさかギターの神様を生で、しかもアリーナ席から拝めるなんて、思いもしなかったので、降って湧いて来たようなチャンスに戸惑いながらも、感慨深く演奏に浸った。



その週の初めには、アメリカで数年前に知り合った音楽家が、カナダ出身の若手注目ピアニスト(ヤン・リシエツキ)をFacebook上で賞賛しているのを見かけた。彼の演奏をネットで聴いてみたところ、稀に見るような透き通った音を奏でるのに魅了され、調べているうちに、その何週間後かに、彼のコンサートが東京で開かれるのを知った。しかもそのコンサート会場は新宿の自宅から歩いて15分で行ける場所だったので、即座にチケットを購入した。彼のコンサートはショパンばかりを集めたプログラムで、それはもう圧巻。後に彼とツーショットで(しかも水玉のmatching pairで)写真も撮らせてもらえた。



東京という街には、まるで寄せては返す波のように、毎日こうして世界のビッグスターが行き来している。瞬きをしている間に、もう引き潮だった、なんて気付かないでいることも多そうだ。東京が日々与えてくれる機会はコンサートに限らず多岐に渡る。でも常にアンテナを張り巡らしているなんて、到底私にはできそうにない。そういうところでやけにガメツくなりたくない気もする。では「ガツガツしているのは格好わるい」と言う妙なモットーがある私が、こうして気に入ったアーティストに連続して会えたのは、ただのマグレなのか?いや、本当に好きなものは、こうもっと心とからだの深いところで察知して、宇宙の引き寄せの法則か何かで、向こうからやって来るものなんじゃないか?いい加減に聞こえるかも知れないけど、私は結構こういう化学やら論理的な媒体で説明がつかないような事を信じるのが好きなタチだ。ラジオのダイアル目盛りがお気に入りの局を探し当てた時のように、やっと東京と私の周波数(frequency)が合って来たという事だろうか。


Thursday, March 13, 2014

A new translation of TO LIVE (生きる) by Tanikawa

TO LIVE

To be alive
To be alive now
It's a thirsty throat
It's dazzling sunshine filtering through foliage
It's remembering a certain melody suddenly
It's sneezing


It's holding hands with you


To be alive
To be alive now
It's a miniskirt
It's a planetarium
It's Johann Strauss
It's Picasso
It's the Alps
It's encountering all the beautiful things
And
It's carefully refusing the hidden evil


To be alive
To be alive now
It's being able to cry
It's being able to laugh
It's being able to be angry
It's being free


To be alive
To be alive now


It's a dog barking in the distance now
It's the Earth traveling around now
It's the first cry raised somewhere now
It's the soldier getting hurt somewhere now
It's the swings shaking now


It's the now that's passing now


To be alive
To be alive now
It's birds flying
It's the sea roaring
It's snails crawling


It's people loving one another (falling in love)


The warmth of your hand
It's life

—Shuntaro Tanikawa
(English translation by Naoko Smith)




生きる   
           谷川俊太郎

生きているということ
いま生きているということ
それはのどがかわくということ
木漏れ日がまぶしいということ
ふっと或るメロディを思い出すということ
くしゃみをすること


あなたと手をつなぐこと


生きているということ
いま生きているということ
それはミニスカート
それはプラネタリウム
それはヨハン・シュトラウス
それはピカソ
それはアルプス
すべての美しいものに出会うということ
そして
かくされた悪を注意深くこばむこと


生きているということ
いま生きているということ
泣けるということ
笑えるということ
怒れるということ
自由ということ


生きているということ
いま生きているということ


いま遠くで犬が吠えるということ
いま地球が廻っているということ
いまどこかで産声があがるということ
いまどこかで兵士が傷つくということ
いまぶらんこがゆれているということ


いまいまがすぎてゆくこと


生きているということ
いま生きてるということ
鳥ははばたくということ
海はとどろくということ
かたつむりははうということ


人は愛するということ


あなたの手のぬくみ
いのちということ


Any copyrighted material on this website is included as "fair use," for the purpose of study, review or critical analysis of literary translations only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s).

Friday, March 7, 2014

A new translation of "A DAY UNTIL RETURNING TO THE SOIL ONE DAY" by Tanikawa「いつか土に帰るまでの一日」谷川俊太郎

A DAY UNTIL RETURNING TO THE SOIL ONE DAY

Two friends came over, drunk, and talked until half past three
Intended to go to bed and looked outside while pissing
It was bright outside already and little birds had begun to chirp
Hadn't ended a day this way in a long while

I wanted to write a diary, but I was too sleepy to write
To decide which events of the day to write about
Or not (to write about) is always difficult
There is not one thing that I cannot live without writing
But why don't I feel at ease if I don't write anything?

After pissing I slept about five hours  I forgot all about the dream
Got up thus and so write poetry instead of diary
That's right, I remember now, one of the friends got drunk and
Claimed repeatedly that he respects his wife but does not love her
Another friend was trying to list the names of five authors he dislikes but only able to give three names
We all ate cherries from the deep blue glass bowl 

It is hard to believe a day ended that way, but it did
What's left (and what's lost too) is not only words

Poems cannot exceed words
Only human can be more than words
Last night I was laughing to tears but
Today I have forgotten the reason for laughing as if it never existed 

—Shuntaro Tanikawa
(English Translation by Naoko Smith)





いつか土に帰るまでの一日 
(『世間知ラズ』より 1993)

谷川俊太郎

二人友達が来て三時半まで飲んでしゃべっていった
寝ようと思って小便しながら外を見たら
外はもう明るく小鳥が鳴き始めていた
こういう一日の終わりかたは久しぶりだ

日記を書きたかったが眠くて書けなかった
一日の出来事のうちのどれを書き
どれを書かないかという判断はいつもむずかしい
書かずにいられないことは何ひとつないのに
何も書かずにいると落ち着かないのは何故だろう

小便してからぼくは五時間ほど眠り 夢はすべて忘れ
起きてこうして日記の代わりに詩を書く
そうだ思い出した 友達のひとりは酔って
妻を尊敬しているが愛してはいないと繰り返し主張し
もうひとりは嫌いな作家の名を五人あげようとして三人しかあげられず
みんなで藍色のガラス鉢から桜んぼを食べた

一日はそうして終わったのだと信じがたいがそうはいかない
残ったのは(そして失ったものも)言葉だけじゃないから

詩は言葉を超えることができない
言葉を超えることができるのは人間だけ
ゆうべぼくは涙が出るほど笑ったが
笑った理由を今日はきれいさっぱり忘れている

Friday, January 31, 2014

Recipe: Apple cake using pancake mix and a frying pan! フライパンとホットケーキミックスで作る簡単アップルケーキ (For Shonna)


Ingredients:

Apples 2-3pcs
Pancake mix 1 package
Milk 150-200ml (depending on your pancake mix)
Egg 1pc
Sugar 3 tablespoons
Butter 1 tablespoon
Cinnamon powder






1. Cut apples into thin slices (about 5-8mm.) Leave the skin.


2. Put the sliced apples into the pan with butter. Cook them on medium high heat in the pan.


3. Add sugar and stir-fry them until the apples become soft.


4. While cooking the apples, prepare a bowl, an egg and milk.


5. Mix them well.


6. Add pancake mix.


7. Add some walnuts too if you'd like!


8. Sprinkle cinnamon powder on apples and stir them well.


9. When the apples became soft, turn off the heat.


10. Get another pan ready (a deeper kind) and place the apples as shown in the picture↑


11. Make sure that there is no space in between apples.


12. Yup, don't leave any space in the middle either! Apple it up!


13. Chopsticks come really handy when placing these apple slices! (Fork may work too, but it may break the apples?)


14. Pour the pancake mix over the apples in the pan.


15. Cover it.


16. Put it on low-low heat and bake covered for 15 minutes.


17.  To check if it's done, take a stick and poke the top of the cake slightly in the middle. If the stick comes up with some wet batter, crumbs or stickiness on it, the cake needs to bake some more. If it is dry, then the cake is done!


18. Now it's time to flip the apple cake! Place a big dinner table over the frying pan and flipping it over and Tada~~~! Doesn't it look good!!??


19. Bon appétit! 


Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Two poems by Tanikawa 谷川俊太郎「会う」& 「窓」英語新訳

SEEING YOU

It began with a picture book and a blurry photo
Then one day two large eyes and
A brusque hello
And then unconstrained characters in ink
Little by little, I started seeing you
Before touching your hands 
I touched your soul

—Shuntaro Tanikawa
(English translation by Naoko Smith)

会う
(『女に』より)

     谷川俊太郎

始まりは一冊の絵本とぼやけた写真
やがてある日ふたつの大きな目と
そっけないこんにちは
それからのびのびしたペン書きの文字
私は少しずつあなたに会っていった
あなたの手に触れる前に
魂に触れた


WINDOW


What's happening 
Is so simple but
The reason is complicated

The sunlight from the window 
Does not shine
Into my heart 

In the attic 
Rats run 
Afternoon 

Window is open
Overlapping flat liquid crystal
Without end

From there 
Can't see
Your eyes 

—Shuntaro Tanikawa
(English Translation by Naoko Smith)


(『minimal』より)

     谷川俊太郎

起こっていることは
こんなに単純なのに
その訳はこんぐらかって

窓からの陽射しが
心の中まで
さしてこない

天井裏を
鼠が走る
午後

平たい液晶に
限りなく重なって
開いている窓

そこからは
見えない
君の目



Saturday, January 18, 2014

Sputniko! スプツニ子!さんのこと

最近、とっても気になる人がいる。スプツニ子!さんという、理系アーティスト/MITメディアラボ助教授だ。クリスマスの頃に買った雑誌を何気なくめくっていたら、後ろの方に、彼女が書いた本「はみだす力」についての特集があって、そこでスプツニ子!さんの存在を知った。面白そうな人!と直感的に魅かれて、すぐに彼女のツイッターを覗いてみた。ツイッター上で彼女は、日本の人工知能学会の学会誌の表紙デザインを厳しく批判していた。下がその問題の表紙デザインで、うつろな目をした女の子のロボットが、ケーブルにつながれて掃除をしている、というもの。


人工知能学会の学会誌「人工知能」の表紙:人工知能学会のウェブサイトより
まじめな学会の表紙がそこいらの漫画みたいな表紙だったことにまず驚いたが、私がもっと驚いたのは、スプツニ子!さんが「フェミニストにありがちな過剰反応だ」とか「あなたの考えは偏ってる」と沢山の人(主に日本人の男性)に逆に叩かれていたことだ。それでも彼女はめげることなく、喧嘩をふっかける沢山の男たちを相手に、「国際的な視点を要求される学会誌の表紙に家事をする女性型ロボットが無自覚に起用されてしまったことが問題。性差別だ。米国で、学会誌が黒人のお掃除ロボットを表紙にしたら大問題になる!」と一歩も下がろうとしていなかった。また、某有名大でロボット研究をしている女の子がスプツニ子!さんのトークの後、「理系研究はオタクが多く、日本のヒューマノイド開発の対象は初音ミクや美少女ばかりで<都合のいい女>を競って開発するような環境に女性研究者として馴染めない」と話してくれたことも語り、「無意識で無邪気な性差別意識」にあふれる日本社会に対する危機感を訴えかけていた。

こんなに頼もしい女性がいたものか!と喜び勇んで、私は格好の獲物を見つけたライオンのように彼女のつぶやきに食いつき、下のような返事をツイートした:




そんなスプツニ子!さんが近々ラジオに出演することを知って、大晦日の深夜、NHKFMの特別番組「スプツニ子!はみだす力 2014 新春ラジオ」を聴いた。そこでも彼女は私の期待を裏切ることなく、とても興味深いことを言っていた。中でも私がなるほどな〜と思ったのは、来る2020年の東京オリンピックの開会式について。彼女は、大まじめに「正しい日本」を伝えようとしないで、遊び心を入れるのも必要だと語った。例えば、オリンピックのセキュリティーガード(ガードマン)が全員忍者のいでたちをしていて、入場券は手裏剣だったりすると、忍者好きの外国人なんかは大いに喜ぶんじゃないか、と言っていた。何故かというと、彼女はMITでアメリカ人によく忍者について聞かれたりするらしい。確かにそう、私もアメリカに10年以上住んでいたので、アメリカ人の忍者に対する強い憧れは熟知している。去年アメリカの大学で日本文化のクラスを教えた時も、「どうしてこの日本文化のクラスを受講しているの?」という質問に「忍者が好き。忍者についてもっと知りたいから」と、目をキラキラさせて語る学生に何人も会った。2年前に金沢を旅行した時に出会ったアイルランド人の男の子も、子供の頃からずっと忍者に魅せられていて、金沢にある忍者屋敷を見るために、日本に来たようなものだ、と言っていた。スプツニ子!さんは、GEISHAとか外国人の好きそうな、でも「ちょっと勘違いの日本」でもいい。勘違いから始まった日本愛でもいいじゃないか、と言っていた。今まで私も「正しい日本」を教えようと、日本語や日本文化を教えてきたけれど、彼女の考え方はとても斬新で、しかも説得力があって考えさせられた。もっともっと彼女のことを知りたくなってしまった。

そこで買ったのが彼女の初著書「はみだす力」だ。いじめと戦い、劣等感の塊だった思春期。研究や制作に明け暮れた学生時代。決められた型に収まらずに、ぶっ飛んだ生き方をしながらも、世界のアートシーンから認められ、着々と成功を収めていく様が、読んでいてとても気持ちいい。ついにはアカデミアにも目をつけられ、MITメディアラボの助教授の座にまで登り詰めていく彼女。ラジオでも誰かが言っていたけれど、出る杭は打たれるけれど、出過ぎる杭は打たれない、というのをスプツニ子!さんが身をもって証明してくれたような気がする。これからも、彼女の活躍っぷりに、ますます目が離せない。


※この本は自分用に一冊、そして16歳になる私の継娘 (step-daughter)にも一冊買った。スプツニ子!さんと同じハーフとして日本で育っているので共感できる点も多いかも知れない。これからも彼女らしく、自由に生きていってほしいという思いを込めて、この本を贈ろうと思っている。